Shafina, 26

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I decided to be a voter because I realised that being apolitical was a great exercise of my privilege. While I have not found any parties championing for policies I believe in, change still needs to start somewhere. 
— Shafina, 26

I like social justice, comedy, and critiques. 

One thing that surprises other Malaysians about me is how I mostly speak English, yet love eating petai and refer to my parents as Umi and Walid. 

I'm good at making people laugh, analysing subversive narratives, and putting men down. 

One thing I'm proud of is holding the Malaysian record of being the youngest person to assemble a computer when I was 9 years old. I think I still hold the record, but even if I don't anymore it just speaks to the great drive and thirst all young Malaysians have for better connectivity. 

I decided to be a voter because I realised that being apolitical was a great exercise of my privilege. I used to believe my voice doesn't matter to the government, and that their decisions will not affect me. While I have not found any parties championing for policies I believe in, change still needs to start somewhere. 

I'm most worried about climate change, government accountability and transparency, as well as religious and racial conflicts. 

These issues matter to me because they're the ones that have been greatly shaped by history, and have received the most resistance when activists set out to improve the situations of both sides. 

I wish I knew more about the actual policies every party is campaigning for, how the government works on the local level and where it intersects with the federal government. 

Watan1991, Selangor