Yi Wei, 28

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One thing that surprises other Malaysians about me is I left a high-paying job in Hong Kong to join Malaysian politics.
— Yi Wei, 28

I like reading, trip hop, and Led Zeppelin.

One thing that surprises other Malaysians about me is I left a high-paying job in Hong Kong to join Malaysian politics.

I'm good at speed-reading, and making "that's what she said" jokes.

One thing I'm proud of is saving enough to cover my uni scholarship. I missed the required grade due to a serious sports injury. I took a gap year internship and managed my finances without burdening my parents.

I decided to be a voter because I want my voice to count. Coming from a family of civil servants made me realise how our institutions desperately need systemic and culture reform. Voting at the very least allows me to choose the government that I think can initiate and execute those reforms.

I'm most worried about lack of education, political instability and lack of political freedom, as well as religious and racial conflicts.

These issues matter to me because Malaysian society is increasingly polarised on racial and religious lines. We don't know how to agree to disagree. I don't think corruption will break our nation as quickly as religious / racial conflicts can.

I wish I knew more about Malaysian national security and immigration policies.

I want other young people to know that we shouldn't disavow politics. The state of politics is only as good or bad as the people in it. Start small; support a candidate / aspiring young leader you identify with. Otherwise, be the candidate.

 

Watan1989, Perak