Liy, 30

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Access to knowledge is the best defense against keeping us small, isolated, and petty. It prevents us from being terrorised against each other, and helps us resist and solve the damage we do to our only planet.
— Liyana, 30

I like uncovering stories of amazing women in modern and ancient history, strategy games, and long mornings in bed.

One thing that surprises other Malaysians about me is that I'm perfectly happy not being a mother. Not every woman wants to or should be a mother! We are complex and varied people. Personally, I thrive when I put that energy into maintaining my friendships instead.

I'm good at asking questions when I don't understand, organising and summarising large amounts of information in useful ways, and typing really fast.

One thing I'm proud of is running a zine distro for almost three years now with two of my close friends. We donate our profits to help persecuted maknyahs and other marginalised people. I'm proud to live my values by speaking up against the harassment of vulnerable communities.

I decided to be a voter after I was inspired by thousands of united Malaysians claiming their democratic right to question injustice in public because they care about our country. I was 20, and shocked that they were teargassed for it.

I'm most worried about digital security, lack of education, as well as climate change.

These issues matter to me because learning and access to knowledge is the best defense against keeping us small, isolated, and petty. Data out there shows that education reduces poverty, sexism, and racism. It prevents us from being terrorised against each other, and helps us resist and solve the damage we do to our only planet.

I wish I knew more about plumbing, electrical work, mechanical and other DIY skills so I wouldn't have to let strange men into my home. In fact, I wish I know of women professionals whose plumbing / wiring work I could support! 

I want other young people to know that we're more important and more powerful than we've been made to feel. We were raised to bully and compete instead of cooperate and uplift each other. We were raised not to question old habits and end toxic practices. We were raised to listen and not be heard. It's our turn to set new standards. We can be taken seriously if we take each other seriously. We can be heard if we hear each other. The less we do, the more power older people continue to hold for themselves.

Watan