Surekha, 27

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As a Malaysian Indian, my family and relatives have continually been victimised. They were disqualified for public tertiary education despite high performance. They were unjustifiably humiliated by police and authorities. They get prejudiced in social spaces and workplaces because of their skin colour.
— Surekha, 27

I like cooking, Issa Rae, and taking down the patriarchy. 

One thing that surprises other Malaysians about me is that I love to talk about race and politics, despite racial privilege still being a sensitive issue for many Malaysians. 

I'm good at writing and rustic-style baking. 

One thing I'm proud of is that I once wrote a short play about race relations in Malaysia that was staged in KLPAC. The script was later adapted by a group of high school students! I felt like a proud parent. 

I decided to be a voter because I was jaded with race politics in Malaysia, and at the time, I felt like voting was the most powerful way to be heard. 

I'm most worried about government accountability and transparency, lack of education, and religious and racial conflicts. 

These issues matter to me because as a Malaysian Indian, my family and relatives have continually been victimised. They were disqualified for public tertiary education despite high performance. They were unjustifiably humiliated by police and authorities. They get prejudiced in social spaces and workplaces because of their skin colour. 

I wish I knew more about the systemic oppression of East Malaysians, as well as the diversity of their needs and cultures. 

I want other young people to know that it's okay to speak up against discrimination and prejudice even if people tear you down. There's power in your voice, however insignificant you may think it is. 

Watan1990, Selangor